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Baby Connectome Project

The goal of this study is to further learn how a healthy human brain changes and works, specifically at a very young age. This study will help us learn more about children's mental, emotional and behavioral development, as well as understanding the possible causes of learning disabilities and neurodevelopmental disorders. This will be done by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of the child's brain during various times of development. Not only is MRI a safe and non-invasive procedure, but there will be no medication or sedation used for this study at any point.

Age & Gender

  • 0 years ~ 5 years
  • Male, Female

Location

North Carolina (Statewide)

Incentives

Target Gift Card / $90

In-person visits : 2
Total length of participation : 1 week ~ 2 years

Looking for Healthy Volunteers

Requirements for healthy volunteers are different than for those with a specific condition. If you are interested in becoming a healthy volunteer for this study, use the below categories to determine if you are able to participate.

Able to participate:

  • Child born between gestational age of 37-42 weeks with normal birth weight
  • Absence of major pregnancy and delivery complications

Not eligible if:

  • Child is adopted
  • 1st degree relative with autism
  • Intellectual disability
  • Bipolar disorder

Contact the Team

Visit Location

100% Remote (online, phone, text)

Additional Study Information

Principal Investigator

Weili Lin
Radiology - Research

Study Topics

Behavior
Brain, Head, Nervous System
Child and Teen Health
Healthy Volunteer or General Population

IRB Number

16-1943

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